The Happy Theory @ The Yard Theatre

Another cohort of Generation Arts’ talented performers come together for their end of year gala performance to showcase their abilities, and as usual, it’s a delight. The company aims to train aspiring actors from marginalised backgrounds for free, and the majority of these performers go on to drama schools. This year’s performance The Happy Theory is devised by the young company themselves, directed by Ali Godfrey, and is a massive burst of energy that has you laughing all the way through.

As school comes to an end, a class of students is debating a question put forward to them by their teacher: can money buy happiness? For some, the answer to this is straightforward, but to others it’s complicated, and for all of them it’s a way to consider their next steps in life. They just need to learn to accept their difference, but that’s easier said than done.

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The piece weaves the stories of each of the characters together neatly, holding your attention throughout. The ensemble is terrific and mesh well together, and in true Generation Arts style, everyone is encouraged to play to their strengths. This allows gems like Helder Fernandes and Robert O’Reilly to shine with their over-the-top comedy that leaves the audience roaring with laughter. The perfectly timed subtle humour of Elena Burciu, who plays the lovable and bumbling teaching assistant Ms Simmons, is also a brilliant addition to the piece.

The most touching relationship is the one between teacher Jada – a strong performance by Tania Nwachukwu – and her younger sister Denise who is scared to leave her house. Adrienne Bailey gives a nuanced performance as Denise, capturing the character’s fears well. The two have a powerful bond on stage that adds warmth to the play. Jay Martin as Ethan, a young student struggling to cope with his mother’s terminal cancer, is also deserving of a mention. His performance is touching and heartfelt, and the final speech he delivers is deeply moving.

Overall Generation Arts have created a piece full of laugh-out-loud humour and emotional scenes, that showcases the talent of their students while celebrating difference. This year’s ensemble is destined to go on and do great things.

Find out more about Genertion Arts. The Happy Theory is at The Yard Theatre until 24th June.

Macbeth @ C, Edinburgh Fringe

It is always a challenge to find a new approach to any Shakespeare play, and when the Fringe boasts of over 10 productions and adaptations of Macbeth, it can be hard to stick out from the crowd. But when a group of 17-21 year olds from Hackney get together, they’re able to bring a breath of fresh air to Shakespeare’s play.Set in the cutthroat world of the British music industry, TWIST Theatre Company’s Macbeth is an exciting and energetic musical adaptation that does not disappoint.

Duncan King (Kieran Smith), founder of the music label King Records, has worked his way up from a poor London Estate, to owning a successful business in the British Music Industry. Duncan has helped talented young people from his estate also achieve success, like friends Macbeth (Andre Fyffe) and Banquo (Ryan Yengo). When the Witches, a group of three rejected female artists, make predictions about Macbeth and Banquo’s futures, the two brush the young women off. However, as Macbeth’s first prophecy is fulfilled, he becomes determined to do all he can to make sure he gets to the top of King Records as predicted by the Witches. Encouraged by his partner-in-crime Lady M (Malika Cholwe), Macbeth decides to do all he can to achieve this goal, even if that includes murdering those close to him.

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Chowle is the stand-out performer as Lady M. Her beautifully smooth voice exerts power on stage, easily influencing Macbeth’s choices. Similarly the Witches, performed by Dominique Florent-Lee, Shadale Grant and Kali Mcloughlin are outstanding. The hiphop, R&B and Grime influenced music allows the company to play around with Shakespeare’s text, rhythmically weaving it into modern-day London. In particular, the use of Afrobeats during the Witches’ potion scene is very enjoyable to watch, especially as the dancing seemingly intensifies their supernatural power. Like Fyffe and Yengo’s skillful rapping, the Witches use music as a way to strengthen their bond, unity and power.

TWIST Theatre Company’s Macbeth cleverly infuses poetry with music, dance and comedy to create a fresh new adaptation. While highlighting the dog-eat-dog world of the music industry, the company showcases their immense talent and very visible love for performance, producing a great musical. To top it all off, the show ends with a step dance, so what’s not to like?

Macbeth is at C (+1) until 20th August.