‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore @ Paradise at Augustines, Edinburgh Fringe

John Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore is a challenging play for a modern audience. The exploration of incest is dark and difficult to stomach, but the complexities it exhibits are fascinating. Wanton Theatre’s adaptation however does not utilise the drama and complicated themes of Ford’s play, and the shock it creates in the beginning loses its power after the second Act.

Giovanni (Louis Catliff), back from his studies at University, is speaking to the Friar (Noah Liebmiller) about his desire for his sister Annabella (Ellie Burke). The Friar warns him about his emotions, but Giovanni disregards him, professing his love to her. To his surprise, she reciprocates, and the two consummate their love. But Annabella falls pregnant and is forced to marry Soranzo (Joss Gillespie) who soon finds out about the siblings’ incestuous love, leading to a tragic ending.

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The show has some promising performances. Burke portrays Annabella with passion and there is real emotion in her repentance. However, some of the action was hard to watch due to the yelling as a means of projecting intensity by the actors. Ryan Hay’s direction also doesn’t focus enough on Philotis’ characterisation. Philotis is a young girl who is used by the men around her but is “saved” in the end of the play after she is sent to a convent. Her appearance seems to serve no  function in this adaptation, apart from to boost the number of female actors on stage. While ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore attracts attentions during the incestuous sex scene, it loses this impact when it doesn’t follow through during the more violently gory scenes. Consequently the gouging of tutoress Putana’s eyes is flat and doesn’t evoke much emotion. Even when Annabella’s heart is brought out onto the stage, it isn’t bloody enough. Overall, Wanton Theatre’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore falls short of a memorable adaptation.

‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore is at Paradise at Augustines until 20th August.

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